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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [music] hello, i'm ivette torres and welcome to another edition of "the road to recovery." today we will be talking about diversity issues within the addiction and recovery field. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. marco e. jacome, chief executive officer, healthcare alternative systems incorporated,
us for future episodes. you can [music] hello, i'm ivette torres and welcome to another edition of "the road to recovery." today we will be talking about diversity issues within the addiction and recovery field. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. marco e. jacome, chief executive officer, healthcare alternative systems incorporated, chicago, illinois. john de miranda, president and ceo, stepping stone, san diego, california. william lossiah-bratt, board of directors, southeastern regional representative, faces and voices of recovery, cherokee, north carolina. dr. clark, why should we be concerned about ethnic and racial differences within the addiction and recovery field, as well as other differences? well, one of the things that we want to make sure is that people who have substance use problems are able to recover and that materials that we use can assist them in that process. and so, y
(music) hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about maintaining resiliency and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. a. thomas mclennan, deputy director, white house office of national drug control policy, washington, d.c.; dr. alexandre laudet, addiction and recovery scientist, new york, new york; james smallwood, founder and ceo, the choice is yours, inc., camden, new jersey. pam, how many people in the united states are in recovery? well, the estimates are about 20 million people are in recovery, working on being free of drugs and other-and alcohol. and, alexandre, what is recovery? what are some of the common paths to recovery? well, that's really two different questions. what recovery is, according to people in recovery themselves, is usually, especially for people severely addicted, it is abstinence from drugs and alcohol, as well as s
are two of a kind! ♪ [music] hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about homelessness and substance use disorder treatment. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. richard cho, director of innovations and research, corporation for supportive housing, new haven, connecticut. robert kershaw, business owner and outreach worker, oxford house, incorporated, silver spring, maryland. dr. jesse b. milby, director, medical psychology, substance abuse and homeless research program, department of psychology, university of alabama at birmingham, birmingham, alabama. dr. clark, when is a person categorized as homeless? well, the most important thing is to recognize that when a person lacks a permanent, fixed residence, they meet the category of homeless. now, there are a number of temporary arrangements that people have; for instance, it's e
for recovery. (music) hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today, we'll be talking about providing a continuum of care and improving collaboration among services. joining us in our panel today are dr. thomas kirk, jr., commissioner, connecticut department of mental health and addiction services; paul molloy, ceo and founder, oxford house incorporated; george williams, director, community partnerships, treatment alternatives for safe communities in illinois; lonnetta albright, director, great lakes addiction technology transfer center, university of illinois at chicago, jane adams college of social work. each year, about 40 million debilitating illness or injuries occur to americans as a result of substance use disorders. dr. kirk, what have we learned recently about the science of addiction? a few points are very, very clear. one of them is that substance abuse disorders, whether its substance abuse or substance dependence, it involves changing the chemistry of the brain. and those changes impact on behavior as well as our physical activities. i th
hello, i'm ivette torres and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about recovery and the media, addiction and treatment in entertainment and the news. joining us in our panel today are mark weber, director of communications, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; ron tannenbaum, president and co-founder, intherooms.com, fort lauderdale, florida; dr. w. douglas evans, professor and director, public health communication and marketing program, george washington university, washington, dc; sandra de castro buffington, director, hollywood health & society, usc annenberg norman lear center, beverly hills, california. the media obviously influences how people create their opinions, particularly about addiction and treatment issues in behavior health. and doug, why don't we review what we mean about media today. some time ago, marshall mcluhan said that the medium is the message and that is more true today than ever. media have proliferated and they now perm
are two of a kind! ♪ [music] hello, i'm ivette torres. welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about accessing prevention, treatment and recovery services online. joining us in our panel today are ginger bowler, content manager, the second road, charlottesville, virginia; cynthia reinbock, vice president, clinical services, crc health corporation, cupertino, california; eric hellmuth, director of technology and online communications, joined together, boston university school of public health, boston, massachusetts; dr. farrokh alemi, professor of health, systems administration, school of nursing and health studies, georgetown university, washington, d.c. about 23 million people throughout the country have a problem with alcohol or elicit drugs in the united states. only about 4 million of those have said that they pursued treatment. so that leaves an incredible gap, dr. alemi. what can the online services bring to the need to provide more addiction treatment services? online services can do a great deal. they can reach people that are rural. they can rea
and join the voices for recovery. (music) hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about the importance of using prescription and over-the-counter medications properly. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. timothy condon, deputy director, national institute on drug abuse, national institutes of health, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. barbara krantz, chief executive officer and medical director, hanley center, west palm beach, florida; beverly gmerek, prescription drug abuse prevention program coordinator, peer assistance services inc., denver, colorado. dr. clark, how prevalent is prescription drug misuse in the united states? well, we estimate that there are approximately 15 million people who misuse prescription drugs in the united states, and that gives us an estimated 2.5 million new
'm ivette torres and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about treating addiction among our nation's youth. joining us in our panel today are frances harding, director, center for substance abuse prevention, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; monique bourgeois, executive director, association of recovery schools, fort washington, pennsylvania; greg williams, co-director, connecticut turning to youth and families, danbury, connecticut; dr. mark godley, director, research and development, chestnut health systems, bloomington, illinois. fran, what is the extent of the problem with youth in america? our most recent survey from samhsa is that around 10 million, a little over 10 million of our young people, are using alcohol and substances. that actually breaks down to 26 percent of them are drinking and another 17 percent of them are binge drinking, which is having more than five drinks in a row at one setting. so it's a concern of ours that our young people are
and minds. (music) hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about maintaining resiliency and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services,
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)